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Rejecting a candidate, what you shouldn’t do!

By June 13, 2017Blog, Hiring Talents

Rejecting an eager candidate can be especially distressing if he or she have passed the first 2 interviews and not the third one. It seems that only a few employers reject their candidate job application in professional way.
Here are a few steps you can follow to be a more considerate and professional company:

Give an answer, even if it’s a no!

Applicants spend a considerable amount of timing revising their CVs and preparing cover letters. The least they deserve is a response to their effort. Build an automated message that you can send out to all the rejected applicants. It will keep an applicant at ease and avoid continuous follow up calls and emails by the applicant.

But why?

For candidates who were actually given a chance, it would be good to explain to them why they didn’t qualify or what they could have done better or what they need to work on. I think we can all appreciate some constructive criticisms in this competitive market.

It’s not what you say but how you say it…
Instead of using demotivating words like “rejected” or “unqualified”, say it in a more positive light like “the selection team will not be pursuing your candidacy further, we will retain your application in consideration for other openings”.

As an organization we should feel a responsibility to treat people with respect and dignity. After all, it is in the company’s favor to leave the applicants with a positive view.