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Interviewing for Behavioural Skills

By November 21, 2016Hiring Talents

Once you’ve confirmed a candidate has the hard skills and qualifications needed for the job, the nuanced part of recruitment comes into play. Most traditional interview questions don’t go much further into depth about behaviours than asking the typical what is your greatest weakness and time management questions.

In this area, many companies are learning to be more precise about behaviours than just a good impression and references that check out. This is because many interviewers don’t choose behaviour questions based on the job at hand.

For example, in hiring a safety engineer asking a longer format question, like one about morning routines might give a better glimpse into the thoroughness and attentiveness of a future employee than asking a question about following protocol, which as a predictable answer.

Another example of behaviour questions often left out in the energy industry are problem-solving questions and scenarios. Formulating questions that directly or indirectly display a candidate’s initiative, creativity, resourcefulness, analytical thinking, determination, and how results-oriented they are is the best way to really tap into behavioural points than can differentiate a great candidate from the perfect match.

By incorporating questions that are tailored to identify if the candidate has the temperament and behaviour to excel in the position hiring managers are much more likely to ensure success.